Chair Back Covers

February 5, 2014 § 2 Comments

Crochet chair back covers Gosh, it’s been a while! ๐Ÿ™‚ Won’t bore you with the details, but despite my best intentions it has been very difficult to find any time for blogging of late. Without further ado, here is a little project that I completed a while ago, which is nice and easy, with practical results. I made these for my dining room chairs after repairing the wall in the hope that it might save me having to do it again too soon. It has. ๐Ÿ™‚ The photo above was taken recently, and they have had a little wear, and perhaps look a bit saggy round the edges. So try and ignore that and look at the crisp clean ones in the images below, ok? Squares As you will have no doubt realised, the good old granny square is the basis for this design. It doesn’t matter which method you use. I haven’t included a granny square pattern because most people won’t need one and they’re readily available on the internet. Cotton would be better than wool for this because it needs to be hardwearing and less stretchy. I used Wendy Luxury Supreme Cotton DK ย and a 3.5mm hook. My first complete granny square is below. You can vary the size according to the depth that you want the chair back to be, but it probably needs to be at least 8cm square in order to have enough staying power when you fit it to the back of the chair. granny square image - part of crochet chair back cover walkthrough Once you’ve made one, you will be able to judge how many squares you will need to fit across the back of the chair. I made four to fit across one side of the chair, and slip stitched each square to the next as I worked, slip stitching into each of the spaces along the side of the square. Ideally your squares should fit across the front of the chair and overlap the sides slightly, so that you can make the same number of squares for the back and join the two together to fit all the way round the chair top. You want it to be quite a snug fit, so make sure that it is pulled taut when you are measuring. My four squares weren’t quite long enough, so once I had joined them I worked another couple of rows of granny square trebles (US double crochet) on each end so that the strip went half way round the chair top. You can then make an identical piece for the back of the chair and join it to the first to form a tube that will fit around the chair: squares joined for chairback cover Edging When the squares are joined, work an edging along the bottom with a row of granny trebles and ch-3 picots in between as per the illustration below. Double crochet (US single crochet) evenly around the top edge, which will form the base for the piece that fits over the top of the chair. diagram for chair back covers Top Flap At this point, make sure the tube is placed symmetrically on the chair and mark the two double crochet stitches which fall at the two front corners of the chair. You can see in the third image above that I’ve marked these stitches with safety pins. These stitches will be the beginning and end stitches of the rows forming a flap to fit over the top of the chair. Rejoin your yarn in the marked stitch on the right hand side (left if you’re left-handed), and work a row of double crochet until you have worked in the second marked stitch and turn. Continue working rows of double crochet until the flap created meets the top edge of the squares running along the back of the chair. It may help to mark the two corner stitches at the back, in the same way as before, to help you see how long the flap needs to extend, and to ensure that the ‘back’ is the same width as the ‘front’. You can see one corner marked with a safety pin in the image below. top flap on chair back cover When the flap is the right size, fasten off and pin the edge of the flap to meet the back edge of the squares where it will be joined. Rejoin the yarn at the front corner and work a double crochet seam through both layers around the two short edges and the long back edge. Remember to increase at the corners – I worked 2dc stitches in 2 stitches at each of the back corners. Don’t fasten off when you’ve finished this seam. pin and join top flap on chair back cover I wanted to create a cushioned ridge along the back edge of the chair to give some extra protection to the back corners. To do this, I carried on crocheting another two rows worked onto the double crochet seam, and then rolled this extra piece in and sewed the last row to the base of the double crochet seam. top ridge around chair back cover Ties I used two pieces of cotton tape to tie the cover to the chair, but in hindsight I think it might be better with an extra one in the middle as well to keep the cover from sagging. Each piece of tape measured approx 40cm with a little extra allowed for finishing the raw ends. This was long enough to tie around the bar running along the top of the chair frame, but not so long that the tapes hung down beneath the bottom of the cover. You may need to adjust the length according to your own chair. Measure in from each side of the chair to see where these will be placed, making them far enough in from the edge to avoid the frame of the chair back. measure width from end of chair for tapes on chair back cover Mark the same distance in from each end of the cover. Find the midpoint of each piece of tape and sew the tapes to the cover on the inside, so there is an equal amount front and back to tie. sew tapes to inside of chair back cover Tie in position and the chair covers are ready. tie tapes onto chair for chair back cover

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